round up: last two weeks of term

29th February – 13th March

I’ve been back in Norfolk for five days already, so it’s high time I got back on top of things here on et cetera. There’s lots to come in the next few days and weeks now I’ve got some time on my hands, but since I’ve missed the last two Sunday round-ups I thought I’d amalgamate the final two weeks of term into one post, since I spent the majority of it at my desk writing my last two essays of my first year at university.

1457115194121

Those two essays seem worlds away now, although this time last week I was so involved with my one for Victorian Literatures that I’d practically started speaking like a character from a Dickens novel. They were, however, hugely enjoyable: as I said in my last Sunday round-up, for Global Lit I wrote on Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (please add one of her books to your reading lists!). The novel’s protagonist writes a blog about her experiences as a Nigerian living in the USA, and as I’m allowed to choose whatever I wish to write about for my essays I was allowed to write on the relationship between blogging and identity in the text which was so fascinating. For my Victorian essay I researched and wrote about the depiction of female adolescence in Silas Marner by George Eliot and Charlotte Brontë’s Villette, which was an extraordinary topic.

Essays weren’t the only thing going on during these last two weeks of term though; in week 9 we still had lectures and classes scheduled as well as end-of-term socials. My last Victorian Literature seminar was interrupted by the surprise arrival of a heavy snowfall; all term I’ve had to make the trek from Heslington East to Wentworth College which is probably about a mile and a half, but after the snow I was grateful I’d been timetabled there, despite the incredibly treacherous journey back across the bridge over the lake.

Wentworth College in the snow, University of York

Alongside all this, week 9 also served as the final Nouse production week of term. Somehow my amazing Features Team managed to get us entirely finished by midday on Tuesday which is practically unheard of – I was so pleased, and it meant we all had more time for essay work. Becca and I also headed to the LitSoc social, but we weren’t really feeling it as we hardly knew anyone there, so we made our excuses and left, stopping off at Rev’s for a couple of cocktails and a long chat which was lovely – definitely something we’ll have to do more of next term.

1456964802985

After my Global essay was handed in on the Monday of week 10 I gave myself an afternoon off and headed into town for coffee, cake and a bit of diary writing. I also had the wonderful treat of Dad stopping for a brief visit on his way up to Hull where he was giving a keynote speech the following day; we went out for a meal at the stunning Assembly Rooms, and his visit was exactly what I needed to get me in the mindset for work. Once it was over, I suffered very suddenly from burnout.

Mum came to pick me up on Sunday. She arrived a little before midday and we packed up the car before heading into the city; I took her to Filmore and Union for lunch and then to Crumbs to pick up some cupcakes to take home, and then out of nowhere we were driving away, leaving the Moors, hazy in the bright sunset, far behind us. I need this break, but I knew then I’d miss it more than I realised.

1457115636717

Follow:

2 Comments

  1. 18/03/2016 / 1:03 pm

    It’s nice to see how you are developing an attachment to the city of York, Lucy. I think that’s important, to help you get the most out of your university experience, and to enjoy your surroundings too. At least we have had some decent weather here in Norfolk for the last few days, so good to come home to some sunshine.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    • Lucy Furneaux
      19/03/2016 / 5:41 pm

      I definitely agree – I’m finally starting to feel a little less like a tourist and more like a local, which is definitely exciting, and I’m looking forward to making it ‘mine’, if you will, over the next few months and years. Lx

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *